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Think clearly about the future.
 

OCE bLog

NEWS CHANNEL 8: Environmental groups signal intent to sue St. Pete after sewage dump (coverage at: http://wfla.com/2016/09/29/environmental-groups-signal-intent-to-sue-st-pete-after-sewage-dump/)

NEWS CHANNEL 8: Environmental groups signal intent to sue St. Pete after sewage dump (coverage at: http://wfla.com/2016/09/29/environmental-groups-signal-intent-to-sue-st-pete-after-sewage-dump/)

St. PetersBlog: Environmental groups sue Gulfport over sewage overflows (coverage at http://saintpetersblog.com/environmental-groups-sue-gulfport-sewage-overflows/)

St. PetersBlog: Environmental groups sue Gulfport over sewage overflows (coverage at http://saintpetersblog.com/environmental-groups-sue-gulfport-sewage-overflows/)

Sarasota Bay in September 2016, when a massive fish kill occurred due to red tide that was likely fueled by millions of gallons of sewage that spilled, overflowed, and was dumped into local waters during storms throughout September. Photo by Our Children's Earth Foundation.

Sarasota Bay in September 2016, when a massive fish kill occurred due to red tide that was likely fueled by millions of gallons of sewage that spilled, overflowed, and was dumped into local waters during storms throughout September. Photo by Our Children's Earth Foundation.

Sick of Sewage in Florida

Our Children's Earth Foundation has a long history of advocacy related to protecting people and ecosystems from one of the more disgusting realities of modern life: sewage pollution. We've brought lawsuits and worked with cities throughout the United States to ensure that aging, leaky, and otherwise inadequate sewage infrastructure is updated, and that impacted residents have a voice in developing solutions. Spills and overflows of raw and partially-treated sewage occur regularly in metropolitan areas, and the worst instances result in massive die-offs of fish, birds, and other animals that rely on nearby waters. We are currently involved in a regional effort in Florida's Tampa Bay area to address sewage system failures that have garnered national and international headlines since mid-2016, when hundreds of millions of gallons of raw and partially treated sewage were discharged to Tampa Bay, Boca Ciega Bay, and other waters adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico. 

Tampa Bay Times, 12.5.2016: Environmental groups sue St. Petersburg over sewage mess

Tampa Bay Times, 9.9.2016: While St. Petersburg waits for sewage details, health risks emerge

New York Times, 9.16.2016: Sewage Overflow Again Fouls Tampa Bay After Storm

The Economist, 10.22.2016: A View from the Bridge: It will take more than just money to get America moving

KQED | QUEST, 5.26.2009: Wastewater Woes: Sewage Spills in SF Bay 


 
 

Nature is special. 

The latest in our series of short interviews with cute kids talking about ecological issues. Children tend to understand the fundamentals of what we need to do to protect the environment. Because so much of what we need to do is common sense: treat animals with respect and empathy, waste not, keep learning, try to live in harmony with natural resources and systems. Above all, we must continue to work toward healthy air, water, and ecosystems so that future generations have the chance to thrive in an ever-changing world. As Chester notes, "we have to, we have no choice."

 

The distinctive V-shaped blow of a southern right whale.  2 whales – mother and calf, Date: 14/7/2010, Time: 12 pm, Place: Bay of Islands, Northland, Latitude: -35.21337, Longitude: 174.15665  Photo from Explore Images, Bay of Islands. Courtesy of the New Zealand Department of Conservation via Flickr. 

The distinctive V-shaped blow of a southern right whale. 

2 whales – mother and calf, Date: 14/7/2010, Time: 12 pm, Place: Bay of Islands, Northland, Latitude: -35.21337, Longitude: 174.15665 

Photo from Explore Images, Bay of Islands. Courtesy of the New Zealand Department of Conservation via Flickr

OCE @ RWF 

We spent October 1 at the Right Whale Festival in Jacksonville Beach, Florida, chatting with kids and parents, and making hundreds of gyotaku-inspired fish prints.

The Right Whale Festival raises local awareness for the endangered North Atlantic Right Whale (E. glacialis), so-named because it was deemed to be the "right" whale to hunt during the height of the whaling industry, because its docile and curious nature made it easy to kill. Sadly, Right Whales were hunted nearly to extinction, and remain in peril. 

 

Check out the coverage of the event via Channel 4 News at: http://www.news4jax.com/news/florida/duval-county/jacksonville-beach/festival-works-to-save-right-whales-from-extinction

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